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WMI Libraly > Win32_PerfFormattedData_Counters_ProcessorInformation Class

Win32_PerfFormattedData_Counters_ProcessorInformation Class

The Processor Information performance counter set consists of counters that measure aspects of processor activity. The processor is the part of the computer that performs arithmetic and logical computations, initiates operations on peripherals, and runs the threads of processes. A computer can have multiple processors. The Processor Information counter set represents each processor as an instance of the counter set.
Namespace value is root/CIMV2.
WMI Provider value is WmiPerfInst.


Properties

  • C1TransitionsPersec
  • C1 Transitions/sec is the rate that the CPU enters the C1 low-power idle state. The CPU enters the C1 state when it is sufficiently idle and exits this state on any interrupt. This counter displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples, divided by the duration of the sample interval.

  • C2TransitionsPersec
  • C2 Transitions/sec is the rate that the CPU enters the C2 low-power idle state. The CPU enters the C2 state when it is sufficiently idle and exits this state on any interrupt. This counter displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples, divided by the duration of the sample interval.

  • C3TransitionsPersec
  • C3 Transitions/sec is the rate that the CPU enters the C3 low-power idle state. The CPU enters the C3 state when it is sufficiently idle and exits this state on any interrupt. This counter displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples, divided by the duration of the sample interval.

  • Caption
  • A short textual description (one-line string) for the statistic or metric.

  • Description
  • A textual description of the statistic or metric.

  • DPCRate
  • DPC Rate is the rate at which deferred procedure calls (DPCs) were added to the processors DPC queues between the timer ticks of the processor clock. DPCs are interrupts that run at alower priority than standard interrupts. Each processor has its own DPC queue. This counter measures the rate that DPCs were added to the queue, not the number of DPCs in the queue. This counter displays the last observed value only; it is not an average.

  • DPCsQueuedPersec
  • DPCs Queued/sec is the average rate, in incidents per second, at which deferred procedure calls (DPCs) were added to the processor's DPC queue. DPCs are interrupts that run at a lower priority than standard interrupts. Each processor has its own DPC queue. This counter measures the rate that DPCs are added to the queue, not the number of DPCs in the queue. This counter displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples, divided by the duration of the sample interval.

  • Frequency_Object
  • Not applicable.

  • Frequency_PerfTime
  • Not applicable.

  • Frequency_Sys100NS
  • Not applicable.

  • InterruptsPersec
  • Interrupts/sec is the average rate, in incidents per second, at which the processor received and serviced hardware interrupts. It does not include deferred procedure calls (DPCs), which are counted separately. This value is an indirect indicator of the activity of devices that generate interrupts, such as the system clock, the mouse, disk drivers, data communication lines, network interface cards, and other peripheral devices. These devices normally interrupt the processor when they have completed a task or require attention. Normal thread execution is suspended. The system clock typically interrupts the processor every 10 milliseconds, creating a background of interrupt activity. This counter displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples, divided by the duration of the sample interval.

  • Name
  • The Name property defines the label by which the statistic or metric is known. When subclassed, the property can be overridden to be a Key property.

  • ParkingStatus
  • Parking Status represents whether a processor is parked or not.

  • PercentC1Time
  • % C1 Time is the percentage of time the processor spends in the C1 low-power idle state. % C1 Time is a subset of the total processor idle time. C1 low-power idle state enables the processor to maintain its entire context and quickly return to the running state. Not all systems support the % C1 state.

  • PercentC2Time
  • % C2 Time is the percentage of time the processor spends in the C2 low-power idle state. % C2 Time is a subset of the total processor idle time. C2 low-power idle state enables the processor to maintain the context of the system caches. The C2 power state is a lower power and higher exit latency state than C1. Not all systems support the C2 state.

  • PercentC3Time
  • % C3 Time is the percentage of time the processor spends in the C3 low-power idle state. % C3 Time is a subset of the total processor idle time. When the processor is in the C3 low-power idle state it is unable to maintain the coherency of its caches. The C3 power state is a lower power and higher exit latency state than C2. Not all systems support the C3 state.

  • PercentDPCTime
  • % DPC Time is the percentage of time that the processor spent receiving and servicing deferred procedure calls (DPCs) during the sample interval. DPCs are interrupts that run at a lower priority than standard interrupts. % DPC Time is a component of % Privileged Time because DPCs are executed in privileged mode. They are counted separately and are not a component of the interrupt counters. This counter displays the average busy time as a percentage of the sample time.

  • PercentIdleTime
  • % Idle Time is the percentage of time the processor is idle during the sample interval

  • PercentInterruptTime
  • % Interrupt Time is the time the processor spends receiving and servicing hardware interrupts during sample intervals. This value is an indirect indicator of the activity of devices that generate interrupts, such as the system clock, the mouse, disk drivers, data communication lines, network interface cards and other peripheral devices. These devices normally interrupt the processor when they have completed a task or require attention. Normal thread execution is suspended during interrupts. Most system clocks interrupt the processor every 10 milliseconds, creating a background of interrupt activity. suspends normal thread execution during interrupts. This counter displays the average busy time as a percentage of the sample time.

  • PercentofMaximumFrequency
  • % of Maximum Frequency is the percentage of the current processor's maximum frequency.

  • PercentPriorityTime
  • % Priority Time is the percentage of elapsed time that the processor spends executing threads that are not low priority. It is calculated by measuring the percentage of time that the processor spends executing low priority threads or the idle thread and then subtracting that value from 100%. (Each processor has an idle thread to which time is accumulated when no other threads are ready to run). This counter displays the average percentage of busy time observed during the sample interval excluding low priority background work. It should be noted that the accounting calculation of whether the processor is idle is performed at an internal sampling interval of the system clock tick. % Priority Time can therefore underestimate the processor utilization as the processor may be spending a lot of time servicing threads between the system clock sampling interval. Workload based timer applications are one example of applications which are more likely to be measured inaccurately as timers are signaled just after the sample is taken.

  • PercentPrivilegedTime
  • % Privileged Time is the percentage of elapsed time that the process threads spent executing code in privileged mode. When a Windows system service in called, the service will often run in privileged mode to gain access to system-private data. Such data is protected from access by threads executing in user mode. Calls to the system can be explicit or implicit, such as page faults or interrupts. Unlike some early operating systems, Windows uses process boundaries for subsystem protection in addition to the traditional protection of user and privileged modes. Some work done by Windows on behalf of the application might appear in other subsystem processes in addition to the privileged time in the process.

  • PercentProcessorTime
  • % Processor Time is the percentage of elapsed time that the processor spends to execute a non-Idle thread. It is calculated by measuring the percentage of time that the processor spends executing the idle thread and then subtracting that value from 100%. (Each processor has an idle thread to which time is accumulated when no other threads are ready to run). This counter is the primary indicator of processor activity, and displays the average percentage of busy time observed during the sample interval. It should be noted that the accounting calculation of whether the processor is idle is performed at an internal sampling interval of the system clock tick. On todays fast processors, % Processor Time can therefore underestimate the processor utilization as the processor may be spending a lot of time servicing threads between the system clock sampling interval. Workload based timer applications are one example of applications which are more likely to be measured inaccurately as timers are signaled just after the sample is taken.

  • PercentUserTime
  • % User Time is the percentage of elapsed time the processor spends in the user mode. User mode is a restricted processing mode designed for applications, environment subsystems, and integral subsystems. The alternative, privileged mode, is designed for operating system components and allows direct access to hardware and all memory. The operating system switches application threads to privileged mode to access operating system services. This counter displays the average busy time as a percentage of the sample time.

  • ProcessorFrequency
  • Processor Frequency is the frequency of the current processor in megahertz.

  • ProcessorStateFlags
  • Processor State Flags

  • Timestamp_Object
  • Not applicable.

  • Timestamp_PerfTime
  • Not applicable.

  • Timestamp_Sys100NS
  • Not applicable.


    Methods

    Method is not found.

    Example WQL

    SELECT * FROM Win32_PerfFormattedData_Counters_ProcessorInformation
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